Diabetes Malaysia - click for home
 
  Diabetes Malaysia   | About Us | Join Us | Contact Us | Home |
Search: 
 
  Home » Treatment » 

What is Diabetes
Complications
Treatment
  » CPG
Living with Diabetes
Healthy Living
Weight Management
In The Press
Upcoming Events
Buyer's Guide
Interactive Corner
Useful Links
Glossary
About Diabetes Malaysia
DM Branches
Promotions
Permanent Activities
Donations
News and Updates
Featured Stories
Newsletter
Children with Diabetes
Questions Answered
Photo Gallery
Resources and Materials
Diabetes Malaysia Council
Home
DECS
Diabetes Educators Compliance Support
 
arrow Treatment

Non-injectable methods of insulin administration

10 February 2007

There is a new alternative delivery of insulin; namely inhaled powder form of insulin for the treatment of adult patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This is the first new insulin delivery option introduced since the discovery of insulin in the 1920s and is available in the USA last year. It is hope that the availability of inhaled insulin will offer patients more options to better control their blood sugars. The device is not approved for use by children younger than 18.

This product is awaiting for approval from the Malaysian Regulators.

The safety and efficacy of inhaled human insulin have been studied in approximately 2500 adult patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In clinical studies, it reached peak insulin concentration more quickly than injectable regular insulin. In type 1 diabetes, inhaled insulin may be added to longer acting insulins as a replacement for short-acting insulin taken with meals. In type 2 diabetes, inhaled insulin may be used alone, along with oral (non-insulin) pills that control blood sugar, or with longer acting insulins.

Like any insulin product, low blood sugar is a side effect and patients should carefully monitor their blood sugars regularly. Other side effects are cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, and dry mouth.

However inhaled human insulin is not to be used among smoker or those who recently quit smoking (within the last 6 months). Inhaled human insulin is also not recommended in patients with asthma, bronchitis, or emphysema. Baseline tests for lung function are recommended after the first 6 months of treatment and every year thereafter, even if there are no pulmonary symptoms.


  printer Printer-friendly version   printer Send link to a friend

 

  
| | | |
© Copyright Diabetes Malaysia 2007 - 2013    All rights reserved.